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be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: americans seeking work, and many hoping to hold on to their jobs, found little
monitoring. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and hari sreenivasan previews the coming clash between the u.s. and japanese teams in the women's world cup final with christine brennan of "u.s.a. today" and abc. >> this is really a little bit about soccer and a lot about nationalism and about, whether it's tidally-winks or soccer, americans want to see americans win. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoi
. >> brown: once the murdochs were done, another central figure in the scandal-- rebekah brooks-- appeared before the committee. she was editor of the now- defunct "news of the world" during the phone hacking, and later became chief executive at the tabloid's british parent firm news international before resigning last week. brooks said she only recently learned that the phone of the young murder victim, milly dowler, had been targeted. >> it seems incredible that you, as the editor, were so unaware of such fundamental issues to do with this investigation. >> i just.. i think... in some ways, just the opposite-- i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize, know, sanction, approve of anyone listening to the voice mails of milly dowler in those circumstances. >> brown: brooks was arrested on sunday, and she repeatedly said today there were things she could not discuss due to the ongoing investigation. but she did say she has lasting regrets that everything did not come out long ago. >> of course, i have regrets. i mean, the idea that milly dowler's phone was accessed by someo
a government default. >> lehrer: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown gets a rare inside look at a syrian city where anti- government demonstrations have grown bigger and bolder from anthony shadid of "the new york times." >> reporter: hama is syria's fourth largest city. it's a significant place, and since last month when security forces withdrew, you've seen, i think, a notion of freedom emerge there. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more, cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
. executive here in the united kingdom. and rebecca brook she's the chief executive over the news corporate newspapers here in the uk and she was editor and chief at the time of some of the most egregious alleged incident. >> do they have the power of a subpoena? >> there's some question about that. news international, the newspaper division has put out a statement saying that both mr. murdock, james murdock and ms. brooks will cooperate. but they didn't say necessarily that they'll testify so there's some question as to what form that cooperation will take. >> what does news international have to say about the latest allegations concerning former prime minister gordon brown? >> well he made these very anguished charges that news corp. had essentially targeted him, had sought to damage him. and interestingly, the allegations involved two newspapers that are not the tabloid news of the world but now we know it's been shuttered because of the role in the growing scandal. he says the times of london, reporters for the excuse me sunday times, had misrepresented themselves in order to obtain pri
taxes with 9.1% unemployment. >> woodruff: columnist david brooks in the "new york times" today criticized what i said was the anti-tax faction in the republican party and said it does not accept the logic of compromise. he said this is a movement with no sense of moral decency because it's prepared for the united states to ignore the debt limit. >> well, mr. brooks apparently is not listening to the people that i'm hearing from in my state and across the country. look, this deal is is not over yet. we still have some time. thankfully between now and august 2 to reach some sort of negotiated outcome. but what i think david brooks underestimates is what it's going to take to pass this. not only through the house but also through the senate. it's going to require 60 votes in the senate. so it will take more than the president having a press conference or having a meeting. we need to come up with a package that can actually pass both branches of the congress between now and august 2. and i just frankly don't think tax increases particularly during a weak economic recovery, are like
brooks who also had to give up her job at news corp and now is under her own suspicion? >> well, she was editor of news of the world which is the paper at the center of all this, as was andy coalson. and basically all of them have been saying they knew nothing about it. they would not have sanctioned it. and there's a great deal of skepticism. basically what'sappening isç everybody involved in this-- and this includes members of the media, politicians, members of parliament, the police-- are all trying to shift the blame on to someone else. indeed when sir paul and john yates resigned they got a parting shot at david cameron for hiring andy coalson. the same thing is happening with rebecca brooks. she's saying she's done nothing wrong. she's quite angry at having been arrested yesterday. and all this willçç gain in intensity at least for the next 48 hours until parliament goes into recess. >> ifill: prime minister cameron cut short his visit to africa and is coming back to prepare for tomorrow, this inquiry being conducted by parliament. what do we expect there? >> well, tomorr
" editor rebekah brooks remains unclear. for now, she remains c.e.o. of the paper's parent company in britain, news international. there may be implications for murdoch's proposed $12 billion takeover of the cable television network british sky broadcasting as well. his news corporation already owns three other newspapers in britain and, in this country, "the wall street journal", "fox news" and the "new york post" among others. this afternoon, reports surfaced that the company might replace the sunday "news of the world" with another murdoch publication. its sister paper "the sun" -- published weekly and saturday-- could add a sunday edition. for more on this story, we turn to ned temko, a writer for the "observer" newspaper in london. ned, welcome back, thanks for being with us. so what was the thinking behind this dramatic decision to shut down this very profitable newspaper? >> well, the best description i've heard this evening is that this is the first newspaper in history to die of shame. but that's not strictly true. it was a commercial decision. it was a huge exercise in da
, "washington post" columnist michael gerson. david brooks is away tonight. mark what do you make of that fannie mae story? >> well, the -- for home ownership is something i can recall president clinton speaking about it, president bush speaking about it, how important it was, a measure of achievement in the country. but as you go to the story of fannie mae, what it comes down to is they privatized profit. in other words, whether it's the investor. but they socialize losses. in other words, everybody else in the country picks up the tab when it doesn't, when it goes under. that is really --. >> lehrer: while you're making money yourself. >> you're making money, it's mine. >> lehrer: but if i lose t it's yours, government. >> it's yours, taxpayers. and i think that's a really bad public policy. >> lehrer: michael? >> well, it's still also the political context in which everyone's operating right now. as far as i know the president didn't have anything to do with this. but the bursting bubble of the housing market has really undermined confidence in the whole economy. we've had a larger percentage
rebekah brooks, who edited the "news of the world" at the time, to resign. >> sreenivasan: in another development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >>
online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks, among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
gerson. david brooks is off tonight. a few moments ago, the house of representatives did, in fact, pass the boehner bill by a vote of 218 to 210. they needed 216 to pass. there were no democrats among those 218. michael, what words would you use to describe, as a result of that vote a few moments ago, where we are now? >> well, i think it would be fascinating if it weren't so frightening. we have a situation where about 10% of the republican caucus in the house wanted to humiliate their own speaker in order to get a vote on a balanced budget amendment that is symbolic and completely irrelevant to the process. i think that's a sign of weakness on the republican part. it undermined their negotiating status in the senate. i think harry reid now has a lot of cards. i think he's gone to mitch mcconnell and said, what, do your people need to support my approach, the reid approach?" and that's what i believe to be the main approach that's taken and the housing will have to look at it again and they have to pass it with democratic support. >> lehrer: mark, what's happened? >> the irony, jim, on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)